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TOPIC: LWKS for research - syncronizing larger amounts of video material

Re: LWKS for research - syncronizing larger amounts of video material 6 years, 3 months ago #43885

  • fischerb
donkpow wrote:
I don't understand what you want. Either you want an import transcoder with a complete and complex set of tools like ffmbc and ffmpeg or you want a push button solution where lwks sets all the parameters for imports.


yes, i would like to see a better transcoding and export functionality 'within' lightworks!
better in the sense of more freedom to customize and freely use most available formats, and easier to manage, because all this ffmpeg/ffmbc workflows are well known and you will find lots of helpful information about them on the net. and -- yes -- i want to see them 'within' lightworks, because that's the only way to avoid some very important technical shortcomings.

donkpow wrote:
It's not like there are that many options for editable formats. Using this thread as a platform to force your agenda is not a pleasant read.


come on! -- what hidden agenda do i stress so much?

yes -- i could simply say: "pay for the pro lincense and the dnxhd codecs...", but i know from my own experiences, that dnxhd 36 doesn't work very efficient on weak machines with lightworks, so the pro license would not help in this very case...

donkpow wrote:
i just try to In this case, all solutions are at hand for a problem that revolves around transcoding time and storage space. What is your advice on this occasion? Either you have a solution to reduce transcoding time and storage space or you don't.


on the import side i don't see any good alternative to transcoding and proxy use -- so it's more a question, how to integrate this vital preprocessing steps into the user interface of the main program in a more satisfying way --, but on the export side it is quite clear, that a lot of storage waste could be avoided by a more streamlined (=piped) workflow. and there are lots of export options, that are not available at all in lightworks at the moment (e.g. two-pass compression). some of them could be made accessible this way very easy. -- that's my general answer. and in this very case (again): mpeg2 i-frame only 50mbps 720p, this will take less then realtime to transcode, will run acceptable, and needs approximately twice the storage size of the original files.

Re: LWKS for research - syncronizing larger amounts of video material 6 years, 3 months ago #43887

  • donkpow
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  • 6 years, 3 months ago
@fischerb,

I am sorry, I still read contradiction in your comments. Perhaps it is because I am a novice to the technical aspects of video production. I note in your criticisms of the development the statements that the program is lacking in the functions related to import and export. Yet, my initial question remains unanswered,"What do you want?" Surely someone who has studied the situation as closely as yourself has a solution to the problems you pose. I just wish you would state clearly the solutions you propose. I am sure interested parties will judge your advice on its merit. What do you propose?
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Re: LWKS for research - syncronizing larger amounts of video material 6 years, 3 months ago #43908

  • shaunthesheep
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  • 6 years, 3 months ago
yes, i would like to see a better transcoding and export functionality 'within' lightworks!
better in the sense of more freedom to customize and freely use most available formats, and easier to manage, because all this ffmpeg/ffmbc workflows are well known and you will find lots of helpful information about them on the net. and -- yes -- i want to see them 'within' lightworks, because that's the only way to avoid some very important technical shortcomings.


There are licensing difficulties that prevent the integration of ffmpeg/ffmbc within Lightworks. See this post by EditShare EMEA Managing Director James Ritchings. Note especially this paragraph:

I think generally there is a lot of misunderstanding about codecs and licenses. The reality is almost every codec available has patents and consequently royalties due to the owners of the technology. People are under the impression that because FFMPEG exists, the codecs must be free to use. That's not the case. In fact, if you look at FFMPEG's license, they state quite clearly that they are simply providing the technology, but some of the codecs are subject to licensing and it is up to the individual user to obtain that license. Avid DNxHD is a good example of this. Yes it is available in FFMPEG and FFMPEG is free. But if you distribute Avid DNxHD in a commercial product for realtime production, then you are obliged to pay Avid a royalty.
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