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TOPIC: What video formats are compatible?

What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7845

  • Ivy726
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I know .avi files don't work. If you don't mind, can someone please tell me what file types can be imported into Lightworks? I read the list, and I'm not quite tech savvy, so can someone put it in simpler terms for me? I'm trying to import videos, but they don't work. It says "Codec not supported" for everything. Quicktime .mov files, .avi files, .flv files. is there anything that will work without fail? >o< Thanks for your help!

I did download the codec pack, but it still doesnt work/i dont know how to get lightworks to use it. I use a Windows 7 PC.
Last Edit: 8 years, 11 months ago by Ivy726.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7846

  • GoceNakov
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Any avi container which have Matrox codec you downloaded will be editable in LW, any mov container with H264 or mp4 codec inside will be editable.

Bare in mind that the files need to be same frame rate as your project or LW wouldn't imported them.

I suggest you to do little research in the net about codec's or use more user friendly (amater) NLE.

Best regards

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7862

  • frans
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It is not that .avi's don't work, LW just can't read some .avi's.

AVI (.avi) is a 'container', it can hold video encoded with many different codecs - and only few of the possible codecs that can be contained in an AVI are supported by LW. Codec support for AVI contained videos comes from the Matrox codec packs. With the Matrox codecs LW can primarily handle DV (as you might know from tape based camcorders) and professional DV variants like DV50 and DVCPRO.

To use MOV containers with MPEG media in them you need to install a recent Quicktime (V7-something), but again, it might not support everything that can conceivable be put in there.

That said, LW does not read all AVI containers with DV in them - LW doesn't like files created by SONY's flash recoding unit. My guess is that this is because they are type-1 AVI's while most avi's are type-2. When I re-write these AVI's with something like Virtualdub (without recoding), LW will read them.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7863

  • shaunthesheep
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The latest LW alpha now supports type 1 AVI. I have tested it and it works fine. It should be in the next beta release.
Desktop
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Laptop
Dell Precision M6700, i7 3740QM CPU @2.70Ghz, NVidia Quadro K3000M, 8GB ram. Windows 7 64 bit SP1.

I am not employed by EditShare. I am a Lightworks user.
Last Edit: 8 years, 11 months ago by shaunthesheep.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7867

  • frans
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Excellent.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7915

  • braders
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GoceNakov wrote:
Any avi container which have Matrox codec you downloaded will be editable in LW, any mov container with H264 or mp4 codec inside will be editable.

Bare in mind that the files need to be same frame rate as your project or LW wouldn't imported them.

I suggest you to do little research in the net about codec's or use more user friendly (amater) NLE.

Best regards


Really, is that in the spirit of what LW is about. You knew nothing at one time too! If you are so 'au fait' why don't you actually contribute to the open source nature of the product here in this forum, and enlighten us with some priceless information on the net. Info that might help other users be inspired to create something.

For me, there is so much information i had no idea where to start and it's kinda hard to filter the crap from quality.

It seems to me that the issue is not the program itself - there is a steep learning curve with all editors - but rather the complication that it is limited in codec support. So, the trouble a lot of forum posters seem to be having is transcoding there files to even import. Maybe if we could all import our files without needing workarounds and random internet downloads, we could all contribute to what this program was designed to do - edit video.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7928

  • frans
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Mhh, but most codecs would either (a) require devs to pay license fee or (b) can not be used with closed source software. The(b) category might be resolved when LW goes Open Source.

For trans-coding, if it's in an AVI I suggest trying Virtualdub first. It uses VfW and should read anything that is handled by Video for Windows - and it will allow you to write with any of those Matrox VfW codecs. You also get some basic trimming and filtering capabilities.

If it's not in an AVI you could either go for VLC mediaplayer or Avisynth. VLC uses libavcodec, Avisynth has access Video for Windows, DirectShow or various plugins including fairly good decoders for MPEG-2 and AVC.
Last Edit: 8 years, 11 months ago by frans.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7942

  • ABCRONNIE
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Hi Braders

Here's the next novel lol.

CODEC: (1) Short for compressor/decompressor, a codec is any technology for compressing and decompressing data. In our case Braders, the data happens to be video & Audio. Codecs can be implemented in software, hardware or a combination of both. Some popular codecs for computer video include MPEG, Indeo and Cinepak.

CONTAINERS and Codecs:
Think of the container as the envelope. The Codec as the language the letter is written in once you open the envelope.

To continue the analogy, why is there more than one envelope?
For the same reason there is more than one of most anything. People come along and have different requirements, or want different features, or to accomodate new technology, etc.
Or maybe just want a proprietary filetype to prevent compatibility with others (Apple and Sony are notorious for that.)

So Braders, LW Beta 10.0.3 the version we are all running, is compatible with AVI type 2 containers (Type 1 to be implemented in the next beta release of Lightworks) , MOV containers, & MXF containers (P2 & XDCAM SD & HD). Now comes the tricky part... Each of these three Containers (envelopes) can have a letter inside written in one of many different languages (Codec) for example H.264, MPG, MPEG, MPEG-2 to name just a few. See the list below.

The Lightworks 2010 Guide on page 265 shows what file types can be imported provided they are in one of the above containers (Envelopes). On page 256 you will find a list of Formats that lightworks Beta 10.0.3 will export, note some of these are Still Image Formats. You probably have dealt with these with your Canon D1 IV Camera (Nice One) and some are Video Formats and others are Audio only formats. It's worth mentioning too that there are many codecs that are now obsolete and there will no doubt be many new codecs that appear in the next few years as the algorithms are refined and compression methods improve. I won't bore you with all that stuff because believe me it does my head in and I have been at this for years.

So remember the envelope (Container) can contain any one of a myriad of letters (Codec) written in many languages and there are no hard and fast rules.

If I have to do my head in so can you LOL - below will give you a bit of an idea:

A variety of codecs can be implemented with relative ease on PCs and in consumer electronics equipment. It's therefore possible for multiple codecs to be available in the same product, avoiding the need to choose a single dominant codec for compatibility reasons. In the end, it seems unlikely that one codec will ever supplant all others.

Current Popular Codecs
The following sections cover some widely used video codecs, starting with the ones that are currently most popular, followed by a chronological-order list of the ones specified in international standards.

MPEG-4 part 10 / H.264 / AVC
MPEG-4 part 10 is a standard technically aligned with the ITU-T.s H.264 and often also referred to as AVC. This new standard is the current state of the art of ITU-T and MPEG standardized compression technology, and it is rapidly gaining adoption into a wide variety of applications. It uses different profiles and levels to identify different configurations and uses. It contains a number of significant advances in compression capability, and it has recently been adopted into a number of company products, including the Xbox 360, PlayStation Portable, iPod, the Nero Digital product suite, and Mac OS X 10.4, as well as high-definition Blu-ray Disc. Though it has impressive quality at bit rates lower than older codecs like MPEG-2, it is very processor-intensive to edit, encode, and play back, and older computers or low-powered portable devices may have difficulty playing it back or may drain their batteries faster than normal when using it.

MPEG-2 part 2
Used on DVD, on SVCD, and in most digital video broadcasting and cable distribution systems, MPEG-2.s sweet spot in the market is the quality of video it provides for standard-definition video. When used on a standard DVD, it offers good picture quality and supports wide-screen. In terms of technical design, the most significant enhancement in MPEG-2 over its predecessor, MPEG-1 (see the next section), was the addition of support for interlaced video. MPEG-2 is now considered an aged codec, but it has tremendous market acceptance and a very large installed base, and even the relatively new high-definition video acquisition format, HDV, is based on MPEG-2. Its use will decline as a delivery format as more efficient codecs such as AVC and VC-1 are adopted for HD video.

The Rest of the Pack
Plenty of other codecs are available. Some are older versions of the popular standards; others are geared toward specific uses so may not be as well known. Although you may not use or need many of these in your work, it.s good to know the names and backgrounds of what.s available. Many codecs have such similar names that it.s easy to get them confused.

H.261
Used primarily in older videoconferencing and video telephony products, H.261, developed by the ITU-T, was the first practical digital video compression standard. Essentially all subsequent standard video codec designs are based on it. It included such well-established concepts as YCbCr color representation, the 4:2:0 sampling format, 8-bit sample precision, 16 by 16 macroblocks, block-wise motion compensation, 8 by 8 block-wise discrete cosine transformation, zigzag coefficient scanning, scalar quantization, run+value symbol mapping, and variable length coding. H.261 supported only progressive scan video.

MPEG-1 part 2
This is used for video CDs (VCD) and also sometimes for online video. The quality is roughly comparable to that of VHS. If the source video quality is good and the bit rate is high enough, VCD can look better than VHS, but VCD requires high bit rates for this. MPEG-1 offers high compatibility, in that almost any computer can play back MPEG-1 files, and many DVD players also support the VCD format. However, it is an antiquated format that has been surpassed in terms of quality and file size by many others. MPEG-1 supports only progressive scan video.

DV
The DV codec, in terms of file-based content (as opposed to video tape), has two main versions: DV-NTSC, the 720 by 480-pixel default DV codec comes installed with QuickTime for use in accordance with the North American broadcast standard and 720 by 576 DV-PAL is also available for European playback standards.

Avid DV (the other version of DV)
This is considered one of the best (if not the best) DV codecs available. Previous versions were tied to an Avid dongle, but the company has decided to cut the codec free, making it available to anyone wanting to install and use it.

Cineform
This is a high-quality production codec that works on both Mac and PCs and can scale from standard-definition to 4k film resolution. Cineform is a wavelet codec (not a DCT codec) that.s often used as a digital intermediary codec for editing video captured in formats like HDV that, because of the way they.re compressed, are difficult to edit on many systems.

H.263
Used primarily for videoconferencing, video telephony, and Internet video, H.263 represented a significant step forward in standardized compression capability for progressive scan video. Especially at low bit rates, it can provide a substantial improvement in the bit rate needed to reach a given level of fidelity.

MPEG-4 part 2
An MPEG standard that can be used for Internet, broadcast, and on-storage media, MPEG-4 part 2 offers improved quality relative to MPEG-2 and the first version of H.263. Its major technical features beyond prior codec standards consisted of object-oriented coding features and a variety of other such features not necessarily intended for the improvement of ordinary video-coding compression capability. It also included some enhancements of compression capability, both by embracing capabilities developed in H.263 and by adding new ones such as quarter pixel motion compensation. Like MPEG-2, it supports both progressive scan and interlaced video.

DivX, Xvid, FFmpeg MPEG-4, and 3ivx
These are different implementations of MPEG-4 part 2.

Sorenson 3
This is a codec that was popularly used by Apple Quick- Time prior to the launch of H.264. Many of the QuickTime movie trailers found on the Web use this codec.

Sorenson Spark
This is a codec that was licensed to Macromedia for use in its Flash Player 6. This is in the same family as H.263.

Theora
Developed by the Xiph.org Foundation as part of its Ogg project, based upon On2 Technologies. VP3 codec, and christened by On2 as the successor in VP3.s lineage, Theora was designed to compete with MPEG-4 video and similar lower-bit rate video compression schemes.

RealVideo
Developed by RealNetworks, this was a popular codec in the late 1990s and early 2000s but is now fading in importance as newer codecs have evolved and because of a lack of recent updates to its quality and performance.

Cinepak
A very early codec used by Apple.s QuickTime, Cinepak was very popular with interactive CD-ROM authors in the mid 1990s.

x264
A GPL-licensed implementation of H.264 encoding standard, x264 is only an encoder.

Huffyuv
Huffyuv (or HuffYUV) is a very fast, lossless Win32 video codec written by Ben Rudiak-Gould and published under the terms of the GPL as free software, meant to replace uncompressed YCbCr as a video capture format. A more up-to-date version of Huffyuv is also available called Lagarith.

SheerVideo
A family of fast, lossless QuickTime and AVI codecs developed by BitJazz, SheerVideo is a production-based codec that is popular because of its support of Y.CbCr 4:4:4 and 4:2:2 formats, for both 10-bit and 8-bit channels, and for both progressive and interlaced data. It is also available for both Mac and PC, making it ideal for cross platform production environments.

Are you still with me?

Cheers I need a Bex and a lie down after that
Ronnie
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Last Edit: 8 years, 11 months ago by Site Admin. Reason: tidying up

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7946

  • shaunthesheep
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Thanks Ronnie for that. It is very useful summary that filled in a few gaps for me.
Desktop
Dell Inspiron 560MT. Intel Core 2 Quad Q8300 Processor, 6 GB Dual Channel DDR3, Windows 7 64 bit SP1/Ubuntu Studio 14.04.2 duel boot. On-board graphics chip. Samsung SyncMaster S23B35OH LED monitor. EchoAudio Mia 24/96 soundcard.

Laptop
Dell Precision M6700, i7 3740QM CPU @2.70Ghz, NVidia Quadro K3000M, 8GB ram. Windows 7 64 bit SP1.

I am not employed by EditShare. I am a Lightworks user.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7953

  • pbhs
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Many thanks ABCRONNIE.
You have made a really good summary.
If you can further enhance the text puting in "BOLD" some points.
For example

MPEG-4 part 10/H.264/AVC
MPEG-4 part 10 is a standard technically aligned with the ITU-T.s H.264 and often also referred to as AVC. This new standard is the current state of t
.

Ciao.
I compose electronic music with some freeware software.
If you want to listen some of my tracks checks this site :
www.buzztunes.org/music/bhs
Last Edit: 8 years, 11 months ago by pbhs. Reason: grammar !!

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7955

  • Greg_E
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Technically speaking h.264 is an mpeg 4 type (subset) of compression and is also generically referred to as AVCHD which is why he listed it with three different names. It is also lumped in with the "Long GOP" moniker that many applications refer to supporting or not supporting, even though there are many long GOP formats (longer than I frame only) from Mpeg2 for DVD, Sony's XDcam EX, Blueray VC1 or h.264, DivX, and the list goes on.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7972

  • braders
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ABCRONNIE wrote:
Hi Braders
Here's the next novel lol.

CODEC: (1) Short for compressor/decompressor, a codec is any technology for compressing and decompressing data. In our case Braders, the data happens to be video & Audio. Codecs can be implemented in software, hardware or a combination of both. Some popular codecs for computer video include MPEG, Indeo and Cinepak.
CONTAINERS and Codecs : Think of the container as the envelope. The Codec as the language the letter is written in once you open the envelope.
To continue the analogy, why is there more than one envelope?
For the same reason there is more than one of most anything.
People come along and have different requirements, or want
different features, or to accomodate new technology, etc.
Or maybe just want a proprietary filetype to prevent compatibility
with others (Apple and Sony are notorious for that.)
So Braders, LW Beta 10.0.3 the version we are all running, is compatible with AVI type 2 containers, (Type 1 to be implemented in the next beta release of Lightworks) , MOV containers, & MXF containers (P2 & XDCAM SD & HD). Now comes the tricky part each of these three containers (Envelopes) can have a letter inside written in one of many different languages (Codec) for example H.264, MPG, MPEG, MPEG-2 to name just a few.
See the list below. The Lightworks 2010 Guide on page 265 shows what file types can be imported provided they are in one of the above containers (Envelopes). On page 256 you will find a list of Formats that lightworks Beta 10.0.3 will export, note some of these are Still Image Formats You probably have dealt with these with your Canon D1 IV Camera ( Nice One) and some are Video Formats and others are Audio only formats. Its worth mentioning to that there are many codecs that are now obsolete and there will no doubt be many new codecs that appear in the next few years as the algorithms are refined and compression methods improve. I won't bore you with all that stuff because believe me it does my head in and I have been at this for years.
So remember the envelope (Container) can contain any one of a myriad of letters (Codec) written in many languages and there are no hard and fast rules.
If I have to do my head in so can you LOL below will give you a bit of an idea
A variety of codecs can be implemented with relative ease on PCs and in consumer electronics equipment. It's therefore possible for multiple codecs to be available in the same product, avoiding the need to choose a single dominant codec for compatibility reasons. In the end, it seems unlikely that one codec will ever supplant all others.
Current Popular Codecs
The following sections cover some widely used video codecs, starting with the ones that are currently most popular, followed by a chronological-order list of the ones specified in international standards.
MPEG-4 part 10/H.264/AVC
MPEG-4 part 10 is a standard technically aligned with the ITU-T.s H.264 and often also referred to as AVC. This new standard is the current state of the art of ITU-T and MPEG standardized compression technology, and it is rapidly gaining adoption into a wide variety of applications. It uses different profiles and levels to identify different configurations and uses. It contains a number of significant advances in compression capability, and it has recently been adopted into a number of company products, including the Xbox 360, PlayStation Portable, iPod, the Nero Digital product suite, and Mac OS X 10.4, as well as high-definition Blu-ray Disc. Though it has impressive quality at bit rates lower than older codecs like MPEG-2, it is very processor-intensive to edit, encode, and play back, and older computers or low-powered portable devices may have difficulty playing it back or may drain their batteries faster than normal when using it.
MPEG-2 part 2
Used on DVD, on SVCD, and in most digital video broadcasting and cable distribution systems, MPEG-2.s sweet spot in the market is the quality of video it provides for standard-definition video. When used on a standard DVD, it offers good picture quality and supports wide-screen. In terms of technical design, the most significant enhancement in MPEG-2 over its predecessor, MPEG-1 (see the next section), was the addition of support for interlaced video. MPEG-2 is now considered an aged codec, but it has tremendous market acceptance and a very large installed base, and even the relatively new high-definition video acquisition format, HDV, is based on MPEG-2. Its use will decline as a delivery format as more efficient codecs such as AVC and VC-1 are adopted for HD video.
The Rest of the Pack
Plenty of other codecs are available. Some are older versions of the popular standards; others are geared toward specific uses so may not be as well known. Although you may not use or need many of these in your work, it.s good to know the names and backgrounds of what.s available. Many codecs have such similar names that it.s easy to get them confused.
H.261
Used primarily in older videoconferencing and video telephony products, H.261, developed by the ITU-T, was the first practical digital video compression standard. Essentially all subsequent standard video codec designs are based on it. It included such well-established concepts as YCbCr color representation, the 4:2:0 sampling format, 8-bit sample precision, 16 by 16 macroblocks, block-wise motion compensation, 8 by 8 block-wise discrete cosine transformation, zigzag coefficient scanning, scalar quantization, run+value symbol mapping, and variable length coding. H.261 supported only progressive scan video.
MPEG-1 part 2
This is used for video CDs (VCD) and also sometimes for online video. The quality is roughly comparable to that of VHS. If the source video quality is good and the bit rate is high enough, VCD can look better than VHS, but VCD requires high bit rates for this. MPEG-1 offers high compatibility, in that almost any computer can play back MPEG-1 files, and many DVD players also support the VCD format. However, it is an antiquated format that has been surpassed in terms of quality and file size by many others. MPEG-1 supports only progressive scan video.
DV
The DV codec, in terms of file-based content (as opposed to video tape), has two main versions: DV-NTSC, the 720 by 480-pixel default DV codec comes installed with QuickTime for use in accordance with the North American broadcast standard and 720 by 576 DV-PAL is also available for European playback standards.
Avid DV (the other version of DV)
This is considered one of the best (if not the best) DV codecs available. Previous versions were tied to an Avid dongle, but the company has decided to cut the codec free, making it available to anyone wanting to install and use it.
Cineform
This is a high-quality production codec that works on both Mac and PCs and can scale from standard-definition to 4k film resolution. Cineform is a wavelet codec (not a DCT codec) that.s often used as a digital intermediary codec for editing video captured in formats like HDV that, because of the way they.re compressed, are difficult to edit on many systems.
H.263
Used primarily for videoconferencing, video telephony, and Internet video, H.263 represented a significant step forward in standardized compression capability for progressive scan video. Especially at low bit rates, it can provide a substantial improvement in the bit rate needed to reach a given level of fidelity.
MPEG-4 part 2
An MPEG standard that can be used for Internet, broadcast, and on-storage media, MPEG-4 part 2 offers improved quality relative to MPEG-2 and the first version of H.263. Its major technical features beyond prior codec standards consisted of object-oriented coding features and a variety of other such features not necessarily intended for the improvement of ordinary video-coding compression capability. It also included some enhancements of compression capability, both by embracing capabilities developed in H.263 and by adding new ones such as quarter pixel motion compensation. Like MPEG-2, it supports both progressive scan and interlaced video.
DivX, Xvid, FFmpeg MPEG-4, and 3ivx
These are different implementations of MPEG-4 part 2.
Sorenson 3
This is a codec that was popularly used by Apple Quick- Time prior to the launch of H.264. Many of the QuickTime movie trailers found on the Web use this codec.
Sorenson Spark
This is a codec that was licensed to Macromedia for use in its Flash Player 6. This is in the same family as H.263.
Theora
Developed by the Xiph.org Foundation as part of its Ogg project, based upon On2 Technologies. VP3 codec, and christened by On2 as the successor in VP3.s lineage, Theora was designed to compete with MPEG-4 video and similar lower-bit rate video compression schemes.
RealVideo
Developed by RealNetworks, this was a popular codec in the late 1990s and early 2000s but is now fading in importance as newer codecs have evolved and because of a lack of recent updates to its quality and performance.
Cinepak
A very early codec used by Apple.s QuickTime, Cinepak was very popular with interactive CD-ROM authors in the mid 1990s.
x264
A GPL-licensed implementation of H.264 encoding standard, x264 is only an encoder.
Huffyuv
Huffyuv (or HuffYUV) is a very fast, lossless Win32 video codec written by Ben Rudiak-Gould and published under the terms of the GPL as free software, meant to replace uncompressed YCbCr as a video capture format. A more up-to-date version of Huffyuv is also available called Lagarith.
SheerVideo
A family of fast, lossless QuickTime and AVI codecs developed by BitJazz, SheerVideo is a production-based codec that is popular because of its support of Y.CbCr 4:4:4 and 4:2:2 formats, for both 10-bit and 8-bit channels, and for both progressive and interlaced data. It is also available for both Mac and PC, making it ideal for cross platform production environments.
Are you still with me

Cheers I need a Bex and a lie down after that
Ronnie


And thats what i'm talkin bout. Awesome contribution and now for me to absorb.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #7997

  • Ormu
Someone told that he managed to import videos which are encoded using Fraps codec but that codec isn't on this list. So is it possible? And what resolutions and frame rates are supported? I tried to import some clips (840x480/30fps Huffyuv and 640x480/30fps Fraps) but it failed.

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #8012

  • ABCRONNIE
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Hi Ormu

Found this article hope it helps

Fraps (derived from Frames per second) is a benchmarking, screen capture, and real-time video capture utility for DirectX and OpenGL applications. It is commonly used to determine a computer's performance with a game, as well as record gaming footage. The program is very popular in the making of amateur machinima films.
The near lossless Fraps codec allows decoding of Fraps-encoded videos (using a media player capable of decoding the AVI container format) or transcoding to other video formats (with the use of the right software). The Fraps video codec manages to capture videos with minimal impact on game performance, as it has been optimized to achieve compression higher than uncompressed RGB, resulting in smaller filesizes, though the visually lossless format is considerably less space-efficient than more heavily compressed lossy video formats such as H.264. This is because encoding on-the-fly to a high-compression format such as H.264 would have a large negative impact on game performance and only a very fast hard drive could record the immense amount of data produced in using uncompressed video. The Fraps format is a compromise of the two. (Minimum Drive Speed 10,000 RPM)
In order for Fraps to take pictures or capture videos onto their system, users must first be using a program that uses DirectX or OpenGL as a core runtime system. Programs that run in Windows without DirectX or OpenGL are not supported, and therefore Fraps cannot capture desktop applications under Windows 2000 and XP. In Windows Vista the Aero desktop runs through DirectX and can be captured by Fraps.
Fraps can take screenshots in various formats: BMP, TGA, JPEG, and PNG.
Due to Fraps not supporting AVI 2.0 OpenDML extensions (and using AVI 1.0 instead) the maximum clip size is about 3.9 Gb regardless of the filesystem of the destination drive. Should the recorded clip exceed this limit it is automatically split into 2 (or more) separate files.

Regards
Ronnie
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SYSTEM 1
Alienware M17X R3 Laptop Core i7 2760QM CPU
@ 2.4 Ghz.
8 Gig Ram 1600 DDR3
NVidia 560 M Graphics.
1.5 TB 7200rpm Seagate HDD. Raid 0
17" Full 1920x1080 LED Display
2 x USB 3, 1 x ESata, 1 Gig Ethernet, HDMI 1.4 O/P 2 x USB 2.0 Ports.
Display Port, Blu-Ray / DVD Recorder
Windows 7 64 Bit Pro SP 1. LightworksV11.5.1 Pro. 32bit & 64bit.
SYSTEM 2
Apple MACBook PRO Mid 2012 15inch
Software OS Software OS X 10.8.5
Graphics NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M 1024 MB
Memory 8 GB 1600 MHz DDR3
Processor 2.6 GHz Intel Core i7
6TB Thunderbolt Raid 5 Media Drive. 750GB Sys Drive

Re: What video formats are compatible? 8 years, 11 months ago #8028

  • SitMC
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 1
  • 8 years, 11 months ago
shaunthesheep wrote:
The latest LW alpha now supports type 1 AVI. I have tested it and it works fine. It should be in the next beta release.


why cant i import avis (from dv band) to lightwork?still doesnt work for me...
almost no files importable...
so its still no real alternative for editors like final cut...
if I'm wrong tell me how to...

greetings

Sit'
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