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TOPIC: Stupid program

Re: Stupid program 9 months, 3 weeks ago #181507

  • briandrys
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The Lightworks icon probably makes more sense than scissors, since it does what AVID and Premiere Pro call extract. The latter doesn't use scissors as an icon for this, the former uses scissors, but this may be partly due to the X shape, together with the x key for eXtract.

Without any in and out points the same Lightworks button will also act as an empty cut (razor/blade), so if you only want to use the screen controls, you can use this as a dual purpose button. The current Icon of two arrows on either side pointing into a vertical line, seems to imply both functions.

For these operations you can use the viewer buttons, the segment commands in the sequence menu or the keyboard where you have separate keys (x and c). I notice that the latter's icon may be where the onscreen delete icon (extract in the other NLEs) may have been derived from.

EDIT Vegas Pro has scissors, but in this case it's used for a different purpose and there's no razor, you use the "s" key for a split.
Last Edit: 9 months, 3 weeks ago by briandrys.

Re: Stupid program 9 months, 3 weeks ago #181560

  • Bob-Hawkr
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HATE is not a constructive criticism and no basis for discussion

A great memorable quote from the Pure Country movie from Ernest Tucker:

youtu.be/3GTLM89pN0A

in extension of a famous sentence:
Stupid, the stupid one does ...... and says

Re: Stupid program 8 months, 1 week ago #184311

  • Miro1964
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I've done quite a bit Quadruplex 2"editing in the early '80. Was germans Bosh horizontal loading 2” Quadruplex VTRs. Was exactly as you described, using an oscilloscope to see the control track jump and made a precise cut over. Powder (white indeed) was sometime used to see where the head was before performing the cut. Practically impossible to make an entire editing session without a cut sync loss due to the physical cuts. The introduction of 1”VTR by Ampex, introduced the linear electronic video editing as well, because the track recorded by the drum head was diagonal at about 2 degrees with approx. 49 cm length, if I remember well. Impossible to phisically cut such track. So, at that time, Ampex introduced the ACE editor and CMX begin his production as well. Sony follow. Editors need to be engineers to deeply understand all the process to generate video and edit it, involving waveforms, phase monitors, BB generator, video distributors, patch panels, TBCs, tapes, Sync, burst, video switchers, DVE, audio mixers, Chiron and so on. Later, well later, after quite a few generations of videotape formats, AVID, SCITEX, Midia100 etc. simplify all that process introducing the digital nonlinear editing like we use today. Sorry for the nostalgic post… I'm 55 years old and lived all that stuff on my skin. Lot of fun anyway, even at that time!

Re: Stupid program 8 months, 1 week ago #184315

  • jwrl
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If I my memory serves, the Bosch Quad VTR was a badge-engineered Ampex machine. And coincidentally, I've just posted an effect that simulates a Quad VTR and its various problems. It's here.

Re: Stupid program 1 month ago #196106

  • jwrl
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I just found this thread again. I'm indulging in a little personal nostalgia now.

Miro1964 wrote:
I've done quite a bit Quadruplex 2"editing in the early '80 ... Powder (white indeed) was sometime used to see where the head was before performing the cut.


That sounds like physical splicing. The "white powder" was actually magnetic in nature. We used stainless steel particles in an alcohol suspension, applied with a special pen. With skill you could clearly develop the video tracks recorded across the 2" wide tape, and the edit pulses on the control track corresponding to a new frame start. You then cut precisely alongside that pulse between the video tracks and spliced to another section of tape cut the same way. Mylar tape was used to perform the splice. If you were a gun editor the result was a clean undetectable cut between the two video sources. If you weren't the videotape machine would lose lock on the edit and could take up to five seconds to reframe depending on the vintage of the VTR.

At the station at which I worked we had several gun editors, and consequently, no reframes.

Miro1964 wrote:
The introduction of 1”VTR by Ampex, introduced the linear electronic video editing as well, because the track recorded by the drum head was diagonal at about 2 degrees with approx. 49 cm length, if I remember well. Impossible to phisically cut such track. So, at that time, Ampex introduced the ACE editor and CMX begin his production as well.


The ACE editor wasn't the first timecode based edit system, and certainly wasn't the first electronic editor. Electronic editing was available from the early sixties, but in its original form was a manual operation. The edit would be performed 15 to 18 frames after the record button was pressed depending on the television standard. Not very precise, but an experienced operator could achieve reasonably reliable results to within a few frames of the desired cut point.

Since that obviously wasn't very desirable, Ampex soon introduced a means of controlling edits by means of cues recorded on the cue track. The device was called Editec. You could press a button on the fly to mark your edit point, preview the edit before you did it, and adjust the edit position before committing it. We enhanced our Editec by using a fast lock up VTR as a playback source and firing it from the Editec pulse. It did a great deal of heavy lifting for our program production.

Timecode based editing was introduced by EECO in (I think) 1964, but feel free to correct me. We had an EECO based edit suite and it did sterling work putting together drama productions and TV specials. EECO invented the technology and their same timecode format is still in use today. There isn't much technology from that far back that you can say that about!

Ampex introduced the RA-4000 in the 1970s. They didn't sell many because, like us, most people had their own reliable in house systems. The EECO edit controllers were cheaper and every bit as reliable as the RA-4000. Or even more so, from reports that I had from a friend working at the only place in Australia that I knew of that had one. That was followed by the EDM-1, which was an adjunct to Ampex's last quad VTR. I saw one at trade show, and advised the company that I worked for not to bother. They didn't.

In the mean time CMX had come along with the family of CMX edit controllers. Starting with the CMX-600 in 1971 and quickly following with the CMX-50, CMX-200, CMX-300, CMX-340, CMX-400, CMX-3400, CMX-3600, and the CMX-6000. I have used five of those models at various times in my career.

Various other companies followed with their own timecode based edit systems, Sony perhaps being the most notable. I even wrote an off-line edit system for the company that I worked for in my spare time. It controlled three U-matic tape decks and a rudimentary video and audio mixer.

In the mean time recording technologies were changing from 2" to 1" to beta. Then finally we had full file based systems. Over that time I have edited with FCP, Premiere, Avid and Lightworks systems professionally, and played with Vegas and the video editing sections of Resolve and Blender. I was introduced to my first Lightworks in 1991 and have been a devotee ever since.

Well, I've got that off my chest - it's been a busy life!
Last Edit: 1 month ago by jwrl.

Re: Stupid program 1 month ago #196114

  • RWAV
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Alleged and thankfully banned user pokercok has made an unwitting contribution - by awakening the giant within jwrl.

All here salute your many contributions - personally I cherish my own on-line-suite memories of jwrl as the consummate professional.
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Re: Stupid program 1 month ago #196142

  • jwrl
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Thanks RWAV. There hasn't been much of that working life that I haven't enjoyed, and I've met some wonderful people as a result - yourself included. And of course that also includes most recently, users on these forums.

And it's not over yet. Although I'm officially in retirement, since the start of this year I've been working on special effects for a major project. There are times when turnkey effects solutions just don't cut it, and these effects have to be totally invisible. It's a serious challenge.

But I think that we've gone far enough off topic.
Last Edit: 1 month ago by jwrl.
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