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TOPIC: Dark energy Equivalent in Lightworks?

Re: Dark Energy Equivalent in Lightworks? 3 weeks, 1 day ago #207997

  • Tamerlin
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What hugly is saying about LUTs is pretty much spot on. The way that the pros can take advantage of them is that they're very consistent. If over the course of a scene you maintain a consistent exposure and color, you can grade the scene with a single LUT. I don't use LUTs myself, but I do use color space transforms to get my footage into the right color space, and then grade atop that. I can usually grade an entire scene with a single grade, and just go in and finesse a shot here and there where it needs a little extra something.

But that also takes practice and experience. If you know what you're doing you can light a scene so that it looks effortless, but I didn't know how to do that when I started out. I kept having to move lights around all the time, and when you do that it's a lot harder to get a consistent look throughout a scene.

You CAN get that consistency outdoors, but it's not as easy as it looks.

Re: Dark Energy Equivalent in Lightworks? 3 weeks, 1 day ago #207998

  • jwrl
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hugly wrote:
Basically, LUTs tranform one colour space into another. In most cases this operation is not reversible.

Correct. Though that "in most cases" is something that isn't necessarily true.

Tamerlin wrote:
I do use color space transforms to get my footage into the right color space, and then grade atop that.

In the effects project that I spoke about earlier, we set up After Effects to apply a LUT to the Alexa footage to convert it to a convenient working colourspace and built our effects. On export AE saved the end result in the original colourspace so that the colourist didn't have to work with a palette limited by the effects process. We also saved copies from AE with the LUT applied for preview purposes. That usage of LUTs is reasonably standard in these workflows. It meant that we could mix in background plates shot with a different camera, artwork and 3D animation and still give our hard working colourist consistent media that she could use.
Last Edit: 3 weeks ago by jwrl.

Re: Dark Energy Equivalent in Lightworks? 3 weeks, 1 day ago #207999

  • hugly
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jwrl wrote:
Though that "in most cases" is something that isn't necessarily true.

Saying this, I had in mind that something like Rec709 to BT2020 is (potentially) reversible, whereas BT2020 to Rec709 isn't. However, based on the nature of LUTs, only within the precision the LUTs provide.

Edit: In my initial post I reversed the relation, that's corrected.
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Last Edit: 3 weeks ago by hugly.

Re: Dark Energy Equivalent in Lightworks? 3 weeks, 1 day ago #208003

  • jwrl
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In the process that I described above the LUT isn't permanent, therefore it's completely reversible.

Re: Dark Energy Equivalent in Lightworks? 3 weeks, 1 day ago #208004

  • hugly
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A sorry, a misunderstanding. I was referring to a chain of LUTs and didn't understand that you mean applying LUTs for preview only. Of course, removing LUTs prior to rendering reverts to the original losslessly.
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Last Edit: 3 weeks, 1 day ago by hugly.

Re: Dark Energy Equivalent in Lightworks? 3 weeks ago #208028

  • jwrl
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At this point this thread went extremely off topic into a heated discussion over the use of LUTs instead of colour grading. That discussion has been split off to this thread.
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